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Showing posts with label History. Show all posts
Showing posts with label History. Show all posts

Aug 5, 2019

Women of '69, Unboxed (2014)


Intimate, personalized portrait of women of the 1960s through the eyes of one colorful class that graduated in 1969 - same year as Hillary Clinton - and recently turned 65, starting to explore the New Old Age. At a time when these Boomers' parents were asking less of themselves, many of these distinguished citizens are asking more, feeling a Third Wind. Where will it take them? Some are determined to keep making waves. The trigger for these revelations/reminiscences is the class's yearbook. Each photo was a collaboration with a sexy Turkish artist, is full of the 60s spirit of risk, rebelliousness, creativity. Indeed, this yearbook wasn't a book at all. The portraits came to each alumna loose leaf, in a box. Hence our metaphoric title: Unboxed!

Waltz with Bashir (2008)


Director Ari Folman's animated, quasi-documentary Waltz With Bashir follows the filmmaker's emotional attempt to decipher the horrors that unfolded one night in September of 1982, when Christian militia members massacred more than 3,000 Palestinian refugees in the heart of Beirut as Israeli soldiers surrounded the area. Folman was one of those soldiers, but nearly 20 years after the fact, his memories of that night remain particularly hazy. After hearing an old friend recall a vivid nightmare in which he is pursued by 26 ferocious dogs, Folman and his friend conclude that the dream must somehow relate to that fateful mission during the first Lebanon War. When Folman realizes that his recollections regarding that period in his life seem to have somehow been wiped clean, he travels the world to interview old friends and fellow soldiers from the war. Later, as Folman's memory begins to emerge in a series of surreal images, he begins to uncover a truth about himself that will haunt him for the rest of his days.

Aug 4, 2019

Columbus in America (2018)


Filmmaker Paul Puglisi traveled across the US to make sense of the controversy surrounding of one of America's most enduring symbols - Christopher Columbus. Conversations with cultural leaders, historians, activists, authors and educators bring to life the perspectives that molded a 15th century sailor into a genocidal conqueror, a messenger of Christ, a cultural icon and a patriotic hero in a land he never knew existed. With our current socially and politically charged atmosphere in America, young people who have been raised with instant access to information are learning what they aren't taught in school about the consequences of one of the most monumental events in human history. They are leading a movement to re-think what Columbus stands for in a nation guilty of its own atrocities against Native Peoples.

Aug 1, 2019

Orange Sunshine (2016)


Orange Sunshine is the never-before-told story of the Brotherhood of Eternal Love - a spiritual group of surfers and hippies in California, which became the largest suppliers of LSD during the 60's and 70's. This feature-length doc follows their rise to star-status in Psychedelic movement and the "bad trip" that followed.

Jul 30, 2019

Cave of Forgotten Dreams (2010)


Cave of Forgotten Dreams follows an exclusive expedition into the nearly inaccessible Chauvet Cave in France, home to the most ancient visual art known to have been created by man. It's an unforgettable cinematic experience that provides a unique glimpse of the pristine artwork dating back to human hands over 30,000 years ago - almost twice as old as any previous discovery.

Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story (2017)


When Nazi U-Boats torpedo a ship carrying 83 school children during World War II, Hollywood movie star, Hedy Lamarr, decides to exact revenge. At night, after shooting her scenes on set, she works on a secret radio system that will allow the Allies to torpedo Nazi U-Boats with deadly accuracy. Her sketches remain ideas until a chance encounter with an eccentric composer enables her to transform them into useful technology. The secret communication system she creates is groundbreaking and eventually changes the course of history. It would make a terrific fictional film, but this story happens to be true. Hedy Lamarr, the screen siren who was called "the most beautiful woman in the world" and starred alongside Hollywood giants like Spencer Tracy, Jimmy Stewart and Clark Gable, invented a wireless form of communication called "frequency hopping" that revolutionized mobile communications all over the world, a feat that would directly lead to the creation of secure communications for wireless phones, Bluetooth, GPS and WiFi technology itself.

Machete Maidens Unleashed! (2010)


In the 1960s and 70s, drive-in movie theaters and big city grindhouses were eager to book the wildest and most action-packed fare they could find, and low-budget producers were always on the lookout for something unique to offer their viewers. Many of them found it in the Philippines, a country full of exotic locations, cooperative officials and folks willing to work cheap. Local producer Eddie Romero began exporting his cut-rate horror and crime pictures to American distributors in the 60s, and before long U.S. filmmakers were traveling there to shoot crazed jungle epics, women in prison thrillers, bloody horror stories and violent wartime dramas. It certainly helped that Philippine extras and technicians would work hard for low pay, and that local stuntmen didn't seem to worry much about risking their necks for a good shot; as one producer put it, "Human life was cheap, film was cheap -- it was a great place to shoot a movie!" Filmmaker Mark Hartley, who shared the crazed true story of the Australian exploitation movie scene in his documentary Not Quite Hollywood, shares the inside scoop on the wild and wooly world of filmmaking in the Philippines in the 1960s and 70s in Machete Maidens Unleashed! Featuring interviews with Gloria Hendry, Colleen Camp, Sid Haig, R. Lee Ermey, Roger Corman, Joe Dante, Allan Arkush and many more eyewitnesses to the madness of movie making in the Philippine jungles, Machete Maidens Unleashed! was an official selection at the 2010 Toronto International Film Festival.

Jul 28, 2019

The Day We Walked On The Moon (2019)


The Day We Walked on the Moon is the inside story of the first moon landing, told from the unique, first-hand perspective of the astronauts and other key figures on the Apollo 11 Mission and those left behind watching, waiting, and witnessing what remains, 50 years later, one of humanity's greatest achievements.

Jul 27, 2019

Secrets in the Sky: The Untold Story of Skunk Works (2019)


In 1943, in a circus tent in Burbank, CA, a bunch of revolutionary thinkers first gathered together in secrecy to build America's first jet fighter. They were rule benders, chance takers, corner cutters-people who believed that nothing was impossible. In the decades that followed, this secret club would create some of the most iconic flying machines in history: the U-2 spy plane, the SR-71 Blackbird, the F-117 stealth bomber - each of them so unfamiliar, so far ahead of their time, that they were often mistaken for something otherworldly. Secrets in the Sky: The Untold Story of Skunk Works pulls back the veil of secrecy on Lockheed Martin's enigmatic Skunk Works program. It features never-before-seen material: rare photos, films locked away for decades, and entries from the private journals and logbooks of Skunk Works' founder and aerospace legend, Kelly Johnson. With narration by Dennis Quaid, in Kelly Johnson's own words, the film plunges deep into a world shrouded in secrecy - where wars are won or lost not just on the battlefield, but at the design table. Secrets in the Sky: The Untold Story of Skunk Works reveals the incredible story of one small group of bootstrapping engineers and pilots whose innovative aircraft changed world history.

Jul 26, 2019

Red Trees (2017)


Award-winning filmmaker, Marina Willer (Cartas da Mãe), creates an impressionistic visual essay as she traces her father's family journey as one of only twelve Jewish families to survive the Nazi occupation of Prague during World War II. Photographed by Academy Award (R) nominee Cesar Charlone (City of God), the film travels from war-torn Eastern Europe to the color and light of South America and is told through the voice of Willer's father Alfred (as narrated by Tim Piggot Smith, Quantum of Solace), who witnessed bureaucratic nightmares, transportations and suicides but survived to build a post-war life as an architect in Brazil. As the world struggles with the current refugee crisis, RED TREES is a timely look at a family besieged by war who finds peace across an ocean.

Farewell Ferris Wheel (2016)


Farewell Ferris Wheel explores how the U.S. Carnival industry fights to keep itself alive by legally employing Mexican migrant workers with the controversial H-2B guestworker visa.

City 40 (2016)


What appears to be an average looking Soviet city, Ozersk is actually a place contaminated with nuclear materials and citizens living there, enclosed by barbed wire fences, thinking they are helping to save the world.

Jul 25, 2019

I Called Him Morgan (2016)



On a snowy night in February 1972, celebrated jazz musician Lee Morgan was shot dead by his wife Helen during a gig at a club in New York City. The murder sent shockwaves through the jazz community, and the memory of the event still haunts those who knew the Morgans. This documentary by Swedish filmmaker Kasper Collin (My Name Is Albert Ayler) is a love letter to two unique personalities and the music that brought them together. A film about love, jazz and America with cinematography by Bradford Young (DOP, Selma).

Jul 24, 2019

Hunt for the Arctic Ghost Ship (2015)



The film tells the exclusive story of the hunt for HMS Erebus that was lost in 1845 while searching for the North West Passage. In 1845, British explorer Sir John Franklin set off to chart the elusive Northwest Passage, commanding 128 men in two robust and well-stocked Royal Navy ships. They were never heard from again.

Jul 20, 2019

America: Imagine the World Without Her (2014)



Someone once observed: "America is great because she is good; if she ever ceases to be good she will cease to be great." Today that notion of the essential goodness of America is under attack, replaced by another story in which theft and plunder are seen as the defining features of American history-from the theft of Native American and Mexican lands and the exploitation of African labor to a contemporary foreign policy said to be based on stealing oil and a capitalist system that robs people of their "fair share".

Jul 17, 2019

Bisbee '17 (2018)



An old mining town on the Arizona-Mexico border finally reckons with its darkest day: the deportation of 1200 immigrant miners exactly 100 years ago. Locals collaborate to stage recreations of their controversial past.

Jul 13, 2019

The Cold Blue (2018)



They Flew. They Fought. They Died. They Won. THE COLD BLUE is a meditation on youth, war and trauma, and stands as a tribute to one of the world's great filmmakers and the men of the 8th Air Force who flew mission after suicidal mission in the Second World War. Nine of the very few surviving veterans were interviewed in the summer of 2017, and their voices take us through the harrowing summer of 1943. William Wyler, one of Hollywood's most renowned and versatile directors, went to Europe to document the Air War in progress. Wyler flew actual combat missions with B-17's -- and one his three cinematographers was killed during filming. Incredibly, all of the raw color footage Wyler shot for THE MEMPHIS BELLE was recently discovered deep in the vaults of the National Archives, and a new film has been constructed out of the material. This event includes an exclusive behind the scenes look at the making of THE COLD BLUE.

Jul 1, 2019

Hitler's Hollywood (2017)



Filmmaker Rüdiger Suchsland suggests that the Third Reich was essentially an immersive movie starring the German nation, produced and directed by Propaganda Minister Joseph Goebbels. Hitler's Hollywood collages key films from the more than 1000 features the Nazis produced from 1933-1945: musicals, melodramas, romances, costume dramas, war films and when the real war got tough, insanely lavish, over-the-top fantasies. The German volk were portrayed as happy and sporty with lives of exaggerated cheerfulness or, conversely, full of morbid yearning for a death that would serve the Fatherland. Hannah Arendt gives perspective and context: One of the chief characteristics of modern masses (is) they do not trust their eyes and ears, but only their imaginations. What convinces masses are not facts, not even invented facts, but only the consistency of the illusion. It's a frightening insight that could just as easily apply to the American political landscape today.

Jun 30, 2019

The Gilligan Manifesto (2018)



At the height of the Cold War, Gilligan's Island depicted seven Americans living in an analogue of a post-apocalyptic world where the survivors have to rebuild civilization. Remarkably, the society they create is pure communist. Interviews with the show's creator and surviving actors reveal that Gilligan's Island was conceived to celebrate Marxist ideals and lampoon democracy.

Jun 27, 2019

The Sultan and the Saint (2016)



Two men of faith, one a traveling Christian preacher, the other the ruler of a Muslim Empire, bucked a century of war, distrust, and insidious propaganda in a search for mutual respect and common ground. It is the story of Francis of Assisi and the Sultan of Egypt, and their meeting on a bloody battlefield during the period of Christian- Muslim conflict known as the Crusades.


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